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between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
a treaty of friendship and cooperation. by 1974, as egypt began to move into the u.s. orbit, syria emerged as the no. 1 ally. not to say there are no problems between the two sides. the syrian intervention in lebanon clearly displeased moscow as did its agreement to security council to hundred 42. it's one of the few states that supported the soviet invasion of afghanistan in 1979 and was richly rewarded with military aid as a result. that continued until the advent of gorbachev in 1985 to turn off the tap of military aid. the chill in the relationship continued until 2005 when a combination of increasing syrian isolation due to policies in lebanon and a much more aggressive russian foreign policy under vladimir putin established a close russian- syrian relationship we see today. let's look at the policies of vladimir putin in his second term. i see is reacting to be setbacks like the school fiasco, the orange revolution in the ukraine, and the increasing vulnerability of the u.s. in the middle east because of the invasion of iraq which -- and because of the revival in the taliban in afgha
mentioned before, one of the surprises in the report was how vulnerable the u.s. is still, despite the massive shale oil resolution -- revolution. this is not to say that the progress towards energy independence has not provided measurable gains in energy security and reducing volatility, but it is still there. even in a hypothetical world where the u.s. has not become completely self-sufficient in oil. oil markets are completely integrated and we will drive up prices everywhere, including the u.s.. so, while having diversified fuel diversifies away from oil into natural gas and all of this stuff, we will definitely see benefits. it is not a silver bullet that will completely solve the problem. >> steve, i want to go back to you. they were making your point. >> it is about what to do in a situation with ambiguity. my personal opinion, that is the most likely scenario for the iranians. maybe not over the long term, but certainly over the near term. >> next 10 years, perhaps? >> there are historical precedents for that. south africa actually has six nuclear weapons. they never tested
's representatives in the u.s. senate. senator tester will go first, followed by rep river. >> i want to thank everybody in the audience and on the panel and everyone who is listening tonight. how many people in this audience are from the silly -- the city of billings. raise your hand. thank you very much. congressman rewhberg is suing each and everyone of you. i have talked about montana and people working together. the first thing you do when you've got a grass fire, the firefighters put it out and they put their but on their line and you do not respond and say thank you by filing a lawsuit, which is exactly what he did. that is not moving the committee forward. it has been a pleasure for the last six years to represent the great state of montana. people like thomas, who is a veteran in afghanistan and is still a part of active military. he lost part of his legs and an arm. he will have prosthetic legs at some point. to be able to move forward, those people give me a drive for this job. a person like lisa jones, who is a cancer survivor. she went to a committee health center that would not h
will never support a leader in my party in the u.s. senate who would work to overturn roe vs. wade. if when that mcmahon is elected to the senate, no matter what the issue is, she will be empowering a senate majority leader and chairman of the judiciary committee will stop at nothing to erode women's health care. that's a big issue in this campaign. >> it is a myth to think that would be against women's health issues. i am a woman. clearly, i'm going to continue to support access to contraception, mammograms, pap smears, all of them as i did as the ceo of a company that provided all those health benefits to its employees. i absolutely will not do anything that would impact women's health care issues. relative to a supreme court justice, i would hope there would not be a litmus test for president romney when he is supporting -- when he is so -- when he is presenting candidates for the supreme court. supreme court justices decide many issues. while i might not agree on each and everyone, i would want to bet that supreme court justice and judge the best justice for all their beliefs and all of
the only place to go. >> live coverage for the iowa 4th district u.s. house seat. steve king is running for a sixth term. he is challenged by christie vilsack. their debate is on iowa public television. steve king -- and this special edition of iowa press, from carroll. steve king has been winning reelection by comfortable margins, getting a fifth term with 2/3 of the votes cast two years ago. redistricting may be diluting that republican dominance. that is what democrats kristi ville sec may have been hoping when she moved halfway across the state, declaring candidacy for the congressional seat. she has been traveling the state as i will's the first lady during husband tom vilsack's tenure. both of you are familiar with the format. we are in a different setting. we have an audience and television viewers. they promise to not sure at all. -- not sure at all. the questions will be coming from brett awyworth and kay henderson. >> you said being a woman was not a barrier to run for public office. do you want voters to vote for you because you are a woman? >> not at all. i think the delegat
things we are that we need in this country. i am originally from europe. i am an immigrant who was a u.s. citizen. in europe, people talk about politics and are educated about in the family. here, people are apathetic about politics. they take everything for granted because they do not realize that problems could result of the don't pay attention. whether there should be 8 for the line for people who are undecided, they are not undecided, they don't know what is going on. i saw a news item right after the presidential debate on c- span, they were doing a focus group on the undecideds. it turns out that one of the women in the focus group was an actress who was paid to be in the focus group. it just shows the extent to which people who are running once did do people into going for -- want to do people into going for what they what. -- want to dupe people into going for what they want. host: here is a comment on twitter -- here is another bad from crossroads from the karl rove group. >> obama promised -- if your family is making $250,000 per year, my plan will not raise your taxes. >> on
is the u.s. -- part of the world. where do you see progress within cities? where in the u.s.? >> we can point to smarter transportation and public safety and health care. that is not necessarily a smarter city. as marchers city, and it was alluded to a number of times this morning, -- a smarter city, and it was alluded to a number of times this morning, is a city of the complex group of systems. how do you take advantage of the integration of those systems. this is where we are lacking. take a building. you can have a building and you can implement the best building information management system that exists in the world. then you can implement the best physical security system in the world. you be doing pretty well. there is an opportunity there to even better your operation by integrating the two. think of the additional insight you could game and have you could run and manage the building more effectively. the same principle holds true for a city. why are we lagging other countries? sometimes we cannot get out of our own way. it is the way we are organized. it is the way we make decis
, but as of now the rally is still on, 5:30 eastern on monday. later, the former u.s. ambassador to kuwait and somalia discusses diplomacy in conflict zones in the light of attacks in egypt and libya. >> would you support an increase in the presence of the national guard at the u.s.-mexico border in light of this drug violence? >> this is a very complex issue and it takes cooperation between the united states and mexico. i know that you are aware that there was an agreement between the united states and mexico where we help with technical support for boats and aircraft, to help with the war on drugs and the cartels in mexico. this is something we continue to have to do. a pass so, if the people of texas to not know, look it up, pal passover -- el paso is one of the safest cities in america. this is a great community and a great economic engine for our state. >> i have already stated that we should triple the u.s. border patrol. we have to get serious. the question you raised is an important question. mexico is a great and mighty nation and it is tragic what is happening in mexico. i was vi
." we now go to the u.s. institute of peace, which is holding a forum on religion, coexistence, and peace. >> embassador johnson cook is the ambassador at large for international religious freedom. prior to joiningjournal." we now go the state department, senior pastor and ceo of the bronx christian fellowship the art. earlier, a white house fellow on the domestic policy council. president clinton appointed her to serve on the national initiative on peace. in the two years, she has served as ambassador for religious flown to fives continents to promote religious freedom. ambassador? [applause] >> thank you and good morning. the pleasure to be with you today. the united states institute of peace does such great work in the world. the ambassador at large for international freedom. welcome to everyone of you for being here promote religious freedom. ambassador? [applause] with us today, including those who are online, on the air. i want to express my appreciation and gratitude to you, wonderful co-sponsors of the institute of peace of, for hosting today. i wanted knowledge susan h
, bond holders of u.s. debt. the u.s. will not default on its sovereign debt, but there is a huge interest rate risk, and if you are a foreign investor, there's a huge currency risk in investing in. all the new debt in the last two years has been purchased by the federal reserve, up 70% of that, we are self-dealing in our and debt. we did not have market rates. we have artificially low rates. china, japan, opec nations, because they have positive trade values, but if they buy a 30-year bond? no, they are buying short term, because we have historically low interest rates, the lowest maturity in history, and when the interest rates go up, for everyone% increase, it is $160 billion a year in new spending for which we get shinola -- nothing. and now up to 5% below average interest rates. >> isn't it interesting that not more people talk about it on television, and the candidate do not spend much time talking about this. it is just like being in denial. >> we did not go through the decade of george w. bush and the last four years of rock obama, but what they have had to deal with, in f
baldwin in their third and final debate for wisconsin u.s. senate seat. they are competing for the seat of retiring senator herb kohl. this is courtesy of wisn. it is about an hour. >> hello everyone. welcome to our conversation with the candidates. tonight we are done with -- by tammy baldwin and former governor tommy thompson. thank you to both of you for participating tonight. we are in the appellate court room of the law school at marquette university. i'm the host of the statewide public affairs program. the rules are simple. the candidates have jaundice for a conversation about the level of government in our lives. we have asked them to stay on point. the candidates can talk to one another but i will be managing the time is spent on a particular topic. we will have the freedom to move the conversation along. each candidate will have a closing statement along with the 90 statements. -- 90 seconds. there are no opening statements. we flipped a coin. we will begin with night -- tonight with tammy baldwin. i will ask the both the same kind of question. about your portrayal in this cam
support of mitt romney. he will also talk about his views on u.s. foreign aid. join us for "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we want to introduce to you robert o'harrow, an investigative reporter at the washington post. he has been riding an occasional series on cyber security threats for that newspaper. mr. o'harrow, welcome to "the communicators." let's start with 0 day. what is zero day? >> zero day is the name that hackers give to a vulnerability and software that allows a bad guy into a computer system. these gaps take a lot of forms. they have not been previously discovered. so there is no way to block them. when a hacker has a zero day, with the right tools and school bills, they can't. into a system and take control. -- with the right tools and skills, they can take over system. >> how would you describe this series? >> it is really the mission that we were looking into cyber security and cyber war. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of war, and get we realize that maybe one in 1000 people real
, and online at c-span.org. >> sunday a debate in the u.s. senate between linda mcmahon, republican, and representative chris murphy, democrat. รบ >> i will not raise taxes on middle income families. >> now he says five weeks before the election, his big, bold idea, is never mind. >> it's arithmetic. >> sunday watch the entire debate at noon eastern time, here on c-span. >> now a discussion of the changing international order and the president's role in leading foreign policy. this is about an hour and a half. >> i am david rothkopf. we have a terrific panel here. >> we are g going -- we are going to open with a quote, and then i will ask them a couple questions about related issues. following that, at the end of each one of these sort of 20 or 25-minute sks, i'm going to look to you for questions, so we can keep this as interactive as possible and have you as engaged in the discussion as possible. at the end, there will even be a little more time so that if we haven't covered something in the context, then you will be able to introduce that into the discussion, and we will wrap up
on wednesday, the day after the election, we may not know who will be the majority in the u.s. senate. we are looking at about 10 tossup races. a lot of these are 1 point races. my colleague pointed out that when this class of senate seats were last up that we had three states, montana, va., for. a million people voted total. those three state senate races and the majority status of the u.s. senate were decided by 66,600 votes out of 4.8 million. it was hanging by a thread. that is how close it was. quite frankly, i think there are seven races that could be decided by, pick a number, 200,000 votes total nationwide. this not only controlling the senate to but by several seed margins one way or the other. there is an enormous amount of volatility in the senate picture. we will see how it plays out. glen and fred, why don't you join me. i will ask them a handful of questions. and we will open up to the audience and let you guys ask questions. >> you are on my left. that is awesome. i have the republican on my left. anyway, thank you for joining us. i know you guys are incredibly busy. how ma
a nuclear strike capability against the western hemisphere. >> do you ambassadors denied the u.s.s.r. has placed and is placing medium and intermediate range missiles and sites? a yes or no? do not wait for the translation. yes or no? >> 13 days in 1962, live sunday from the jfk presidential library and museum, on the anniversary of the cuban missile crisis. >> two counter-terrorism experts said the obama administration use of ground strikes may be undermining security objectives in places like yemen and pakistan. peter bird and and christopher swift discuss the move from partitive killings to signature strikes, which target groups ahead of men associated with terrorists. according to research, and grown strikes in pakistan have increased from one every 40 days during the bush administration to one every four days. this is from the center for national policy. >> good afternoon. my name is gregory aftandilian. i am a senior fellow for the middle east here at the center for national policy. on behalf of our chairman, and our president, i want to welcome all of you here today. i also want to
by nasd which is the private sector regulator of the u.s. brokerage industry. the focus of this series is on financial regulation. and each year we have had a leading public official responsible in some way for u.s. financial regulation. this year our speaker is a tiny bit of a stretch. he was c.e.o. of freddie mac from mid 2009 to just a few months ago. while in that role he was not a public regulator, he was responsible for returning a very large public financial institution. freddie mac and fannie mae are what are called government sponsored entities, g.s.e.'s. for years they were described as private companies with a public of supporting housing, or, more simply, as mixed public-private enterprises. in september of 2008 both failed financially, were placed in government conservatorship. becoming quite unmixed, just public corporations. the g.s.e.'s have had many problems prior to the could have beenor ship. ed was not part of that, arriving about a year after conservatorship. but he was part of the solution. the task of running freddie mac is a big challenge. it is a very large bus
, episodic and sheriff's race someplace is probably more likely to be stolen then presidential or senator u.s. house race. >> what trace would that be, charlie? let's talk about that. >> i think it's sort of a solution in search of a problem. but i don't -- i think a lot -- i think a lot of the republican concerns are very, very insear but the florida situation, florida republican party, i mean these kinds of things happen on both sides but i don't think it's -- i don't think there's a huge problem but at the same time, you know, in life most of us need i.d.'s to go about our daily lives and i think we ought to try to do something to get photo i.d.'s, official photo i.d.'s in the hands of voters to help them get to their lives up to and including voting. but anyway -- one last, i will throw a last question to the guys. >> thanks. looking back at the 2004 election and strategy president bush and his team implored, when you look at the cycle, we know it will be a close race. what i see on the ground game is the obama campaign thinking and really planning on the field a lot more than governor ro
at 10:03 eastern here on c-span. at 10:50, we will show you a forum on legal issues from the u.s. chamber of commerce. the speakers include several attorneys general and rudy giuliani and that is on c-span 2. at 2:20 eastern, paul ryan will be in cleveland speaking to ohio voters. we will have a live for you. a little bit later, president obama is out west today in denver and we will have his remarks live at 4:50 eastern on c-span. asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president in a short video. they will answer the question -- what is the most important issue the president should consider it in 2013. it is the cspan student camp video competition. for complete details, go online to student cam.org. there was a recent debate to represent the ninth congressional district of arizona. kyrsten sinema has served in the house of representatives and was elected to the arizona senate in 2010 and burnham parker was elected to the paradise valley city council in 2008. this debate is courtesy of kae- tv and is under half an hour. >> tonight's show is a debate bet
in their town hall debate. >> former u.s. senator, arlen specter, pa., has died. in august announced he was battling cancer. over the years he fought two previous bouts with non hodgkin's lymphoma. he was elected to five terms as senator and was the longest serving senator in pennsylvania history. a republican for most of the time, he became a democrat in 2009. he was born in wichita, kan., in 1930, and served in the u.s. air force. he received a law degree from yale university, worked on the warren commission, and practiced law before becoming district attorney in philadelphia. he was 82 years old. reaction is starting to come in. senator john mccain posted on twitter -- arlen specter, a dear friend to serve his state with honor and distinction, r i p on friday, secretary of state hillary clinton told reporters that there is still much that the administration does not know about the september 11 attack on the consulate in libya. earlier in the week the oversight committee heard testimony from department officials on whether the level of security there was adequate prior to the attack.
have in supporting romney is that i feel that since his advisors have advocated a stronger u.s. intervention policy with possible ground troops in yemen, somalia, syria, iran and then special forces operations, that i would like to hear him commit to a war tax that would be put on so that we don't once again charge wars. and i think that it should be put on in the way that president obama talks about, shared sacrifices. so i think it should be some type of transaction fee within the financial community. and i just really feel that romney needs to back up what he's talking about in his more aggressive foreign policy. >> frances, thanks for the call from waldorf, maryland. we are about one hour and 40 minutes away from the start of the debate. and in just over an hour, as we've done with the last three debates, the two presidential, the one vice-presidential debate, we will do something that you will get nowhere else. we'll take you inside the world theater on the campus of lynn university as the members of the commission from presidential debates addresses the gathering. the stu
of serious analysis of the u.s. vital interests. i have not done that, although i have done some writing on that, but that is what is necessary. the point of the paper is that the public discussion is really not focused on that much more relevant question. what is really focused on is an irrelevant question, which is what are the short-term gdp effects of changes in the defense budget, and by implication, other changes in the budget as well, which is the wrong question. the question is, where are the resources used most productively in the coming, and what is the path that to take us there? percent of gdp is not really there, except in terms of -- -- as a measure of what we can afford. >> you talk about reduction of spending in the 1990's, but the domestic budget shrunk as well in the 1990's. bill clinton was in office, federal spending was 22% of gdp. eight years later, we were a little over 18%. that is a big cut in the cost of government. that was the biggest boom period we ever saw in this country. the economy never did better. i do not see evidence that these cutbacks in spending --
in cuba. tried to drawn he tro from the crisis is to avert crises going forward, both the u.s. and soviet union needed to be clearer about what he called the precarious rules of the status quo. when the competition between the u.s. and the soviet union so that neither would surprise the other with a reckless venture within the others' zone of core interests. >> you have to leave it there. perfect conclusion. thank you so much. we are out of time. thank you for joining us. he's the director of the harvard university for science and human affairs. thank you. >> thank you for having me appeared that website is cu banmisslecrisis.org. also tomorrow, bob deans talks about the federal issue. thank you. we will see tomorrow. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> c. the second presidential debate tuesday live on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org next. come "newsmakers" would jim jordon. then the debate between vice president joe biden and paul ryan. after that we will show you the 2000 a presidential town hall debate
off against u.s. congresswoman tammy baldwin, in their third and final debate for the senate seat left open by retiring senator herb kohl. it is a tossup. last about an hour. it's courtesy of wisn tv in milwaukee. >> hello, everyone. welcome to our conversation with the candidates. we are joined by tammy baldwin and tommy thompson. thanks to both of you for participating. >> my daughter. >> i worked as a journalist and served as a fellow in law and public policy here at the university. the rules for tonight's discussion are simple. we have asked candidates to join us for conversation about the role of government in our lives and the direction of our country. we have asked them to answer a question as directly and concisely as possible. we have asked them to stay on point. the candidates may talk to one another, but i will be managing the time we spend on a particular topic and we will have the freedom to move the conversation along. each candidate will have an opposing statement along with 90 seconds. there are no opening statements. we flipped a coin to see who got the first question.
, if there is anything resembling a default on u.s. debt, it is a disaster worldwide. i thought we had learned something from that a year ago. apparently, we have not. the worst thing that happens is a u.s. default on its debt. it would be catastrophic. for no reason, idiotic. it is crazy. >> what is the result? >> every bank in the united states, every major bank, is bankrupt. suddenly, your capital is gone. a lot of capital is tied up in government securities. >> what happens if i go to the bank and what my money? >> it might or may not still be there. it is not like the banks would close. they would not be able to lend. it was like four years ago where you were facing massive bank failures. you still get your money but you would not get a loan. your company might not be able to pay you. the soundest companies in the world could not borrow money. >> there is not enough money. >> of course not. we are talking trillions of dollars. i am not saying a united states the fault is tomorrow. bank of america would end and j.p. morgan would close their doors and got out of business. but it is a serious hit into
it was getting worse. diplomatic security remained weak. in april, only one u.s. diplomatic security agent was stationed there. the rso struggle to obtain additional personnel, but was never able to obtain the numbers he felt comfortable with. i hope the information i provide will be put together with datapoint from others. so and after a picture can be obtained. we need to be dedicated to the understanding, to understand the problems has surrounded this attack in order to find a solution. our failure to do so will result in repeated instances that will allow our adversaries to take an advantage over us. my purpose is to prevent their ability to take the life of another ambassador. or kill another valuable and talented public servant working for the diplomatic service of their country. >> thank you. mr. nordstrom. >> good morning, chairman, ranking members and other distinguished members of the committee. my name is eric nordstrom and i currently serve as a special supervisory special agent with the u.s. department of state diplomatic security. i join the department april 1998 and a surge
, democratic dr. richard carmona, the former u.s. surgeon general. congressman jeff flake. and libertarian mark victor. each candidate will have a opportunity for an opening statement. the honor goes to richard carmona. >> thanks, ted. i am happy to be with you and my colleagues. this is an opportunity -- the fact of the matter is is that over a year ago when my colleagues first approached me, the cops, the firemen and ems personnel, and said there is an open seat, you should run. the first thing i said, is i will run as far away from washington as i can. i have been there. i was not sure i wanted to go back to the dysfunction. the more i thought about it, i realized that we need leadership there. this gridlock has hurt our nation. we have a fiscal cliff. congress has stalled. i have been very fortunate in my life. my mom only wanted one of her kids to graduate from high school i have been able because of a great country to get an education and go to medical school, to be a police officer and a professor. that is because we have a country that is full of opportunity. >> your time's up. dr. carm
of -- of fox ct. >> good evening. tonight representing the connecticut u.s. senate debate between the republican candidates linda mcmahon and chris murphy. welcome. we look forward to hearing more about your ideas and maybe learning some new things. this is going to cover a wide range of topics from the economy to foreign economy. joining me are three panelists. first, my co-hosts. >> there will be no opening statements. that will weaken the right to the questions and answers. there will be a 62nd closing statement. the candidates will each have 20 seconds to answer and then a reach for rebuttal. we do have timekeepers. they will signal when it is up. they will determine which candidate will start the debate. mr. murphy will go first in answering the first question. mr. murphy will go first we get to the closing statements. there were chosen by the hartford courant. the audience here has promised to remain quiet and attentive up with no cheering or jeering and no applause or outburst set any kind during this debate. that takes more time away from learning something about these can
who speaks to the u.s. ambassador on this question -- still the calculation is providing support from the united states into the rebels' hands at this time would have a very uncertain outcome. we are working very hard with the rebel forces, and clearly, as the president said, assad's days are over. they will eventually come to an end. we need to be ready to provide as much support to the moderate forces as we can in the interim. i do want to, if i can, just say one thing about the comments about iran, which is also very related to this serious issue. he does set up the strawman about the sanctions on iran and the 20 countries that have gotten off the hook. i think it is interesting to note that this is where the facts really do matter. the iran sanctions act is the critical piece of legislation that the congress passed in the 1990's to punish iran and those who support its petroleum sector. zero companies were sanctioned by the bush administration under the iran sanctions act in eight years. 0. when the president came into office, he very aggressively moved on the sanctions using exis
, are you prepared to see u.s. troops stay indefinitely? >> at this point i agree with the time line. we want to bring our men and women back home. what troubles me is that when we make decisions for political purposes, perhaps for election purposes. and i'm not sure that plighting our intentions to put out difficult nit time lines was and would be the smartest answer. you've got people over there that want to do us harm. you've got the taliban there that think about human bppings differently than we do. we know about the atrosstiss to women. and so we haven't done a good enough job in educating our country about the bad guys that exist. that we need to meet them offshore before they come on shore. it's only been ten years since 9/11. >> first of all, i applaud the president for having brought our sons and daughters home from iraq. a war we should have never been in and a war i voted against. i have been an advocate in changing our policy in afghanistan to count terrorism. we're trying to prop up a government in afghanistan. couldn't terrorism requires far less troops and focuses at stri
, but they are not different from previous administrations. it has been u.s. policy, regardless of who the president is, since the truman administration, that the united states will stick up for israel and ensure its security in a dangerous neighborhood. the distance that governor romney is going to try to play up is the idea that benjamin netanyahu's government deserves the unqualified backing on domestic israeli policy as well this its policies toward the palestinians. it is correct in the sense that the obama administration has been highly critical of the settlements, but let's keep in mind that george w. bush's father, president george h. w. bush had very much the same differences, and went a step further in criticism. host: virginia. murdoch. independence caller -- independent caller. caller: there is hundreds of years of history of this in the middle east. the british and other european nations at one. divided it up and kind of controlled it through occupation. the american policy has always been to support israel, but we do not look as -- at each individual nation as having their own sovereignty, and w
that is interesting about the story, if it is accurate, it sounds like the u.s. is taking a position where we are likely to jettison our allies. the last thing we would rot -- we would want to do right now is abandon our allies. they have actually been more forward beginning and we have been. host: that was senator portman talking yesterday on "meet the press." here is a follow-up peace from "the new york times." "the u.s. and iran denied plans for a talk on the eve of the debate." host: david axelrod talked about this yesterday on the "meet the press." here he is. [video clip] [no audio] >> the currency has dropped in value by 50%. they are feeling the heat. that is what the sanctions were meant to do. if they are sensible, they are looking at that and saying that it is time to set aside nuclear ambitions and save our economy. that is what president has been working on, the project he has been working on for all of these years. we were isolated in our position on iran myriad should ask about this. host: there is a number in "-- from "bob schieffer." host: we will dig more into foreign policy
at the upcoming agenda on the 18th national congress of china and what it means for u.s.-china relations. china will have new communist party political leaders stressed that discussion will get underway at 12:30 eastern at the woodrow wilson center in washington. we will have at live for you on c-span. a reminder of tonight's debate from the university of denver. at 9:00, jim lehrer will be moderating the debate, focusing on domestic policy. when i.t. is done, we will take your phone calls and e-mails and tweets. live coverage starts at 7:00 p.m. eastern. you can also listen on c-span radio or watch online at c- span.org. well, we apologize but we were expecting the pentagon briefing to get underway momentarily. we are having some technical difficulties with the feed from afghanistan and the remarks from a british lieutenant general adrian bradshaw. he is going to talk about the situation in afghanistan and update reporters via video conference. as soon as this gets established, we will have a live for you on c-span. a quick reminder of live coverage we have before you later today. former secre
think the u.s. economy is ready for a breakthrough. there are some positive signs as we saw last week. but as i mentioned in my opening, i think congress is the shackle. congress is the ankle wait now and ineffective for congress fiscally irresponsible and doesn't know how to work together. the decision to filibuster and block a veteran jobs bill and farm bill before election day is a perfect example we have to put new ways of thinking in congress. we have to fix the economy by investing in infrastructure and expanding educational opportunities and leveling the playing field for small businesses but we can't get there if congress is fiscally responsible and doesn't work together. on the fiscal side i have a record. governor during the worst recession since 1930's, cut by a billion in spending, cut my own -- cut $5 in spending, cut my own pay as lieutenant governor and governor to try to two the right thing to keep virginia leading the way among other states. we were taupe of all of the accolades of states whether i when i was governor at a very difficult time. my opponent has a differ
will be campaigning in lynchburg this afternoon along with his wife and son. we will have that for u.s. for 30 p.m. eastern on c-span. tomorrow on news makers, a kentucky senator rand paul will talk about his support for mitt romney. he will also talk about his role in congress and his views on foreign aid. that begins at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> is a great source of information for the public. if you want to know anything about what is going on with legislation, with policy, c-span has recovered. i like book tv. that is my favorite. it is nice to see so many people that you read about. c-span offers exactly the news as it is happening. it does not offer commentary. it is just telling you the facts and showing you so you can make your own decisions. the decisions are not being told to you. to me, that is very interesting for people who want to be engaged in society and know what is going on. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now a look at the incomes of americans over the last four decades. robert s
. then there's the u.s. one of the country's less dense than the us is canada. for the most part, the united states is at the low end of the density scale. that's why in some ways we have a peculiarly american problem. then we have new jersey and rhode island as the most dense states at 1200 people per square mile and new jersey is more dense than india. the state that's closest to the averages missouri. the state that you can barely see the bar is not because of the color of the image but because there are so low levels of density relative to the high- density states. south dakota it is 10.9 people per square mile or wyoming, 5.9% people per square mile. it cannot be seen if that's the level of difference we have in the u.s. finally, population loss. one thing that's going on is you are thinking about i will invest in something and investment decisions will be motivated by expectations of the future. if you think there will be fewer households in the area you might be serving, that's another thing that could make you think twice about what you will make investments in today. let's put some
. then they will not only be able to arm themselves, but armed terrorists. >> question for ms. long. do you think u.s. involvement in afghanistan was a mistake? should there have been a public deadline for withdrawal? >> it was not a mistake. we went in for a good reason -- to go after the terrorists who caused the 9/11 attacks on america in new york. we need to disable al qaeda. that is our goal. what bothers me is that when the president initiated this, he did so with a timetable as well. it seems to me that his timetable has been politically driven and not driven by military reality our national security and the need to defend our country. the whole timetable has disregarded the recommendations of the general. it is not for the purposes of winning over al qaeda. >> i believe we should be out of afghanistan right now. 10 years ago, we were attacked and 9/11 by al qaeda. they created a base of operations and training ground in afghanistan. it is important to take? -- it was important to take out al qaeda and their operations and take osama bin laden. we have done that. al qaeda has now become an int
copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> tomorrow, live coverage of the u.s. senate debate in virginia between former governors tim kaine and george allen. follow live at -- that begins at 8:00 eastern, followed by the montana senate race at 9:00 between the incumbent and a republican congressman. that is tomorrow on c-span. see the vice presidential debate this thursday night, live on c- span, c-span radio, and c- span.org. watch and engage. next, a discussion on the future of race as a qualifier for college of mission. then an update on the current situation in syria, followed by a discussion on that nation's future. >> this week, the supreme court hears all arguments in fisher vs. university of texas, which deals with race-based admission policies in colleges and universities. the century foundation released in europe or promoting using class status as a alternative to race-based criteria in admissions policies. they posted this forum. it is about 90 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you all for coming. my name is richard kahlenberg. i am a senior fellow at the
to the wiretapping against legal u.s. [applause] we need to repeal the patriot act and we need to stop the persecution of whistle-blowers who blow the whistle on crimes by our government. [applause] >> ten second spirit >> benjamin franklin said if we sacrifice our liberty for security, we will wind up losing both. so let's take back our liberty. that is the foundation of true security. [applause] >> rocky, detaining americans indefinitely. >> i went to law school because i believe as deeply as one can believe it until the rule of law. and justice. the fact that our system of justice can provide for everyone. what we have seen through the bush years and now with president obama has been so absolutely subversive and anti- american. there has been no more anti american act in our history than the ndaa. president obama, in 2009, he asked for the power to indefinitely detained people without charges, without a trial, without legal assistance, and without the right to habeas corpus. we are on the road toward totalitarianism and that is not an exaggeration. [applause] this one person -- if o
in syria will have impact on russia and it's neighborhood which they have the islamic problem. u.s. argues it is lucky at a distance with two oceans on either side and not as exposed as russia is and nobody has been able to tell him what happens when assad leaves. they also believe that the worst groups around assad much leave which pushes assad to dig his leels in and pushes russia to make it happen. i'm sharing the conversation i had with him. and that was not going to happen. and his key question is what happens when assad leaves and this is where the communique and approach we're discussing becomes important. let me for theoretical purposes say for arguments sake. let's say everybody grease to the political set mment and transition. and we agree for a period of a year to go through the political transition. the key question becomes at what point does assad leave? the worst argue that is with assad in place, you will not be able to make any changes or go through transition. so assad must go up front. the russians would want assad to go but maybe at the point when you establish the inter
for u.s. senate and we begin with representative hirono. >> thank you for hosting this debate tonight. and to those of you who are tuning in thank you. you are asking yourself does this u.s. senate race matter to me and my family. that's an important question and i hope you listen for the differences between us. if you're a middle class person, for example, note that my republican opponent's economic priorities are similar to mitt romney's. that's because they both support rich mill nares get tax breaks while middle class taxes go up. or if you're on medicare note my opponent's plan is exactly the same as mitt romney's because they will change medicare into a voucher system and that will end up costing our seniors a lot more money. or you may be asking yourself why don't we create jobs and get our economy going? note my republican opponent has joined with the national republican party to oppose president obama's jobs plan to create 2 million jobs. or you may be asking yourself a larger question what is the best senate for highway hawaii? a senate tied to a republican agenda opposing p
, and then a debate between the candidates running for u.s. senate in arizona. after that, david korn talks about his role in the release of the videotape in which presidential candidate mitt romney talks about the 47% of americans. senators scott brown and elizabeth warren based off wednesday in the third of the four televised debates. in 2010, scott brown defeated martha coakley in a special election for the post held by the late ted kennedy for almost 47 years. this debate is courtesy of -- >> good evening. welcome to symphony hall for a debate between scott brown and elizabeth warren. i am honored to be the moderator tonight. we have rules this evening. our audience of more than 2600 guests have agreed to be silent. no interruptions or applause. each candidate has a minute and 30 seconds to answer each question, and 30 seconds for rebuttal. later, each candidate gets one minute for a closing statement. a coin toss has determined the speaker order. we have received more than 200. every question is based on an idea from the public. elizabeth warren won the first coin toss. just last week, we saw th
of them set the trigger for u.s. involvement, i don't expect eitherer of them to commit to it because i don't think they have the answer. caller: i hope romney brings up these key issues on foreign policy. president obama has failed. russia is the al lie of china and they're in cahoots with iran. they promote terrorist who want to destroy israel and america because we are strong. foreign policy on illegal immigrants coming into america and that affect it is working class or the low income and the middle income because you have anywhere from 10 to 30 million illegals taking jobs and destroying our entitlements which makes it harder on african-american people who have their own issues in america and also the poor. so i hope romney hits him with all these issues because president obama has failed with supporting the killing of libya's -- kadafi and not supporting the dip mats in that country. guest: russia is a good issue to talk about because it highlights one of these secrets of the president on foreign policy. once someone comes in and takes that chair in the white house they find they
affect your vote. caller: absolutely not. and i am an independent for u.s. senate in florida. and i'me-in candidate, single with a mensa iq, and i'm the owner of two companies. geraldine ferraro was the best candidate running back years ago. vote for pete. host: let's go to our next call in hindsville, alabama, on our democrat line. good morning. no, they don't affect my vote. they are very intelligent women, but i've already made up my mind. so the spouses don't have anything to do with that. host: do they give more perspective and to who the candidates are? radio station in washington, wtop, says -- do you feel the spouses can give more of a human side to the person? caller: they might try, but most people see what the. candidates the. it's kind of hard for them to change the way people perceive the spouse. -- they might try, but most people see what the candidate is about. it has no effect on who i will vote for. host: andy is a democrat in florida. caller: i don't think spouses have anything to do with my vote. i vote for who's going to do the best for the people and the country
introduction? it is good to see my friend and one of the finest u.s. senators, your senator, sharon brown -- sherrod brown. your next congresswoman is here. will.i.am is in the house, a man who sometimes looks like he has been to the outer space. i am so grateful. he has been such a great friend for a long time. we also have a man who has actually been to the outer space, and john glenn, in the house. before i begin, i have a question for you. are you registered to vote? because if you are not today, it is the last day you can register. i know it is easy to procrastinate in college. i procrastinated a lot. but we have made it easy. you go to vote.barackobama.com to register yourself. you have until 9:00 p.m. tonight. no excuses. i know you guys are up at 9:00 p.m. as you get older, you start thinking of sleeping around 9:00 p.m., but you are just getting started. if you are registered, you can vote right now, today. just go to the website to find out where, all right? all right. even better, grab your friends. cravaack everybody in your -- grab everybody in your dorm. grab your fraternity
:00 p.m. eastern, secretary of state hillary clinton will be speaking about energy diplomacy and u.s. foreign policy. she is expected to talk about u.s. energy interests, clean energy projects, and securing access to energy resources at 1:00 p.m. eastern. a number of senate debates beginning at 4:00 with the connecticut race. this is the fourth time they are facing off for the seat to replace retiring senator joe lieberman. the debate will be light at 4:00 p.m. here on c-span. as 7:00, former governors tim kane and al and square off in one of the closest races. it will be live from virginia tech at 7:00 p.m. eastern. it is followed by a wisconsin senate debate, the second time that our meeting for the seat of retiring senator. the debate is from university of wisconsin marathon county campus life at 8:00 p.m. eastern. tonight at 9:00, president obama and mitt romney arcing of speakers at the 67th annual alfred e. smith dinner. it has been a tradition of the dinner to invite presidential candidates in election years to make humorous remarks about themselves and the other candidate. he
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